“Don`t expect pets to cause damage, and that`s the big separation here.” In the rental agreement, an owner can indicate whether or not pets are accepted in the rented property. If allowed, landlords can also: before having a pet, tenants must decide with their landlord whether the pet clause in their lease should be negotiated or changed. All changes made must be recorded in the contract, either in a separate written agreement attached to the original or in a handwritten note containing the initials of both parties on the original lease. Owners should remember that the pet clauses in the rental agreement must, where applicable, comply with the statutes of the posted property (e.g. B of a condo). You and your landlord must complete a condition check report at the beginning of your rental and at any time of your rental, if you receive a pet. If you do not participate in the inspection, you may lose the right to recover your deposit. If your landlord doesn`t have two ways to do the inspection or provide you with a full copy of the report, they may lose their right to claim a bond against your pet for damages. For more information, see TRAC Condition Inspection Reports. In principle, in such a situation, the result depends on whether the restriction of pets in the rental agreement is one: Hello Mya, thank you for contacting us. Unfortunately, we do not have rent monitoring and you may need to contact the British Columbia Residential Tenancy Branch.

I hope they will be able to answer your question. Good luck! During a lease, the tenant must comply with the rules relating to pets established in the rental agreement. If a tenant decides they want a pet, they must first check their lease. Even though a tenant may have a pet, the rental agreement may contain restrictions in terms of size, nature, and the number of pets allowed. Fry points out that pet bans are not allowed in Ontario. While we are responsible for certain sectors and specific laws in the province, we have no authority with respect to lease agreements or rental rules in BC. . . .